11:09 pm - Sun, Jul 27, 2014
1,736 notes

"I am a big lover of Mexican folk art and the reason I love it is because it’s very accessible art. I consider it art by the people for the people, but it’s also is a mirror of who we are. […] I eventually came up with the idea of having some of the characters made out of wood because growing up I loved wooden toys, with all their flaws and imperfections. The film takes place post Mexican revolution, it was a hard time. The bad guys in the movie are made out of metal. The idea is that when they went to the army they put metal on themselves but never took it off, and they don’t have any guns because they’re the weapons themselves. In this world, when you’re born, the wood you’re made out of is really smooth and as you grow older the wood starts aging. Wood is life, and there’s also a tree of life that symbolizes it. The movie is dripping with symbolism and magic realism.” - Jorge Gutierrez

(Source: nadiaerre, via pigeony)

4:12 am - Mon, Jul 21, 2014
57,051 notes

pugletto:

Omg, so I’m actually not this bad at making screencap redraws or whatever.

Latin@ Lady & the Tramp this time.

(via kaikainagrif)

12:31 am - Sun, Jul 20, 2014
30,451 notes
leavingourwarbehind:

fuckyeahdiomedes:

fakedick:

zoo-monkey:

I cant lie, this looks and sounds like it’d be great

Hey, let me talk about this for a bit because it’s great. Blaxican started off as a food truck. The owner himself is biracial Black and Mexican and wanted to celebrate the two cultures he was raised in. Not only that, but they use a good amount of their tips from the food truck and restaurant and donate them to organizations that help the less fortunate because the owner strongly believes in giving back to the community and helping those suffering from poverty.

that’s cool as hell

positive that this is all that I need in life.

leavingourwarbehind:

fuckyeahdiomedes:

fakedick:

zoo-monkey:

I cant lie, this looks and sounds like it’d be great

Hey, let me talk about this for a bit because it’s great. Blaxican started off as a food truck. The owner himself is biracial Black and Mexican and wanted to celebrate the two cultures he was raised in. Not only that, but they use a good amount of their tips from the food truck and restaurant and donate them to organizations that help the less fortunate because the owner strongly believes in giving back to the community and helping those suffering from poverty.

that’s cool as hell

positive that this is all that I need in life.

(Source: cmmoncourtec, via obstinaterixatrix)

8:36 pm - Sat, Jul 19, 2014
21,761 notes

nadiezda:

Sailor moon a la mexicana :p

Lo hice por diversión, talvez haga a las demás?

(via feyspirations)

8:18 pm
47,262 notes

elphabaforpresidentofgallifrey:

cornersweetcorner:

iammyurl:

By Erica Kuschel.

If this doesn’t make you want to visit Peru, then you don’t deserve to see these pics. Shoo shoo scroll away.

Cool Llama what are you doing omg somebody put sunglasses on that fellow ahahhaha

kuzco we all know you built this now shut up and let me enjoy the scenery

(via quaility)

6:57 pm
97 notes

the-chibster:

I still find the fact that Brazil and Argentina have a friendship day for the two countries the dumbest most adorable thing ever.

(via internetkatze)

6:47 pm
37 notes

fyeahecuador:

dluces:

El alma en los labios es un poema de Medardo Ángel Silva, poeta Guayaquileño (Ecuador), perteneciente a la llamada Generación decapitada. Silva se lo escribió a su amada unos pocos días antes de quitarse la vida. La música fue compuesta por Francisco Paredes Herrera, también Ecuatoriano, pero de la provincia de Manabí. El pasillo fue popularizado por el Ruiseñor de América, y esta versión es interpretada por Juan Fernando Velasco y Juan Fernando Fonseca (Colombia). Hermoso poema y hermoso pasillo sin duda, mi preparación para el concierto de mañana de Juan Fernando Velasco en Cuenca.

"El Alma en los labios (More or less, my soul hanging from my lips) is a poem by Medardo Ángel Silva, a poet from Guayaquil (Ecuador), who belonged to the Generación Decapitada (Decapited Generation). Silva wrote it for his girlfriend few days before committing suicide. The song was composed by Francisco Paredes Herrera (link in Spanish), also Ecuadorian from the Province of Manabí. The song, a pasillo, was popularized by Julio Jaramillo, famous Ecuadorian singer dubbed “The Nightingale of the Americas”, this cover is sung by Juan Fernando Velasco and Juan Fernado Fonseca (Colombia).”

(via kaikainagrif)

12:16 am - Thu, Jul 10, 2014
1,155 notes
redribbonrobot:

In Aztec mythology, Tlazolteotl is a goddess of purification, steam bath, midwives, filth, and a patroness of adulterers. In Nahuatl, the word tlazolli can refer to vice and diseases. Thus, Tlazolteotl was a goddess of filth (sin), vice, and sexual misdeeds. However, she was a purification goddess as well, who forgave the sins and disease of those caused by misdeeds, particularly sexual misdeeds. Her dual nature is seen in her epithets; Tlaelquani (‘she who eats filth [sin]’) and Tlazolmiquiztli (‘the death caused by lust’), and Ixcuina or Ixcuinan (‘she of two faces’) *from Wikipedia*
Hmm, I might revisit this one because I think I could have pushed this design a bit further…

redribbonrobot:

In Aztec mythology, Tlazolteotl is a goddess of purification, steam bath, midwives, filth, and a patroness of adulterers. In Nahuatl, the word tlazolli can refer to vice and diseases. Thus, Tlazolteotl was a goddess of filth (sin), vice, and sexual misdeeds. However, she was a purification goddess as well, who forgave the sins and disease of those caused by misdeeds, particularly sexual misdeeds. Her dual nature is seen in her epithets; Tlaelquani (‘she who eats filth [sin]’) and Tlazolmiquiztli (‘the death caused by lust’), and Ixcuina or Ixcuinan (‘she of two faces’) *from Wikipedia*

Hmm, I might revisit this one because I think I could have pushed this design a bit further…

(via cuscatlanaziz)

1:42 am - Mon, Jul 7, 2014
7 notes

Hey!

I have recently written and produced a web series about five girls who mysteriously get powers and how they learn to deal with being witches and each other. It features an all women of color cast! Three of our actresses are hispanic and I felt this would be the right place to share Latinas in fantasy with!

If you like our promo episode I just ask you reblog and share the crap out of this!

Follow us on tumblr at www.thewitchesofmisspelled.tumblr.com

Hello, this is Mod QU! Thank you so much for sharing with us!! This looks incredible, and I can’t wait to see more of it :D Mod Jazzy is out of town this weekend, but I’ll share it with her as soon as possible.

Followers, please check out this web series!

1:54 am - Sat, Jun 28, 2014
128 notes

arekisandora:

Some tentative designs for my OC’s, I still need more research! :)

but here they are! 

Peru is wearing the traditional dress from Cuzco, while Colombia is wearing a regional folkloric outfit from the Andean Zone if I remember correctly :)

Unff, I love those clothes but they’re a pain in the butt to draw ;n;, too much details! but so beautiful!

(via cuscatlanaziz)

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